The “Salvage” of usable diesel fuel from fuel contaminated by a microbial growth.

The “Salvage” of usable diesel fuel from fuel contaminated by a microbial growth.

Fuel contamination is a common occurrence in stored fuel of any volume, its presence is directly resulting from many factors having influence of microbial growth
Most farming machines, boats and infrastructure support machinery are only seasonally required to operate, these sit without operation and little maintenance for extended periods of time. The machines will sit in the sun, sea, and rain through seasons with partially filled fuel tanks or even fully filled. The will be required to start up and be operated for periods of heavy extended use,
As Diesel fuel is highly hygroscopic, meaning it readily absorbs moisture from the atmosphere, its rate of becoming contaminated happens can happen at quite an astounding rate, taking operators unaware.
The fuel absorbs moisture with the tank’s expansion and contraction due to radiant heat, atmospheric temperatures, and moisture.
The result of bacterial growths are “dirty fuel” blockages of fuel filtration and at times are easily detectable with the naked eye, as a dark matter in the fuel bowl of when you remove the filter as seen in the image below in extreme cases.
To operate reliably this fuel bacterial growth requires attention to limit its effects.
To be put simply the fuel should be treated, returning the fuel from a contaminated hydrocarbon to one reaching the fuel standards used as guidelines for the manufacture of fuel systems.
This can be done efficiently and effectively with through using a customised “fuel polishing” system, otherwise known as “fuel stabilisation/conditioning”.
Using one the PFMblue’s selected inline units, or a recirculation unit suitably sized for the fuel storage facility capacity, the fuel is “polished” using filtration and photochemistry removing diesel contamination formed by microbial bacteria, fungi and algae that live at the point of blend between water and diesel.
This bacterial colony can be seen at the low point of a tank, or as growth on a glass water bowl on many filters.